saramountain:

from E. R. Kennedy’s twitter, boosting with permission.

thoughtsofablackgirl:

Don’t Come To America And Try To Convince Me That You’re Gangsta Boo”: Rah Digga  On Iggy Azaela
Iggy Azalea, it’s like.,  I can’t really get into her because it’s just not real to me. And not for nothing because people have accents in real life as opposed to when they work. But let me say this to you. There is a white girl from Australia that spits in an Australian accent and her name is Chelsea Jane. That I can get into. Teach me Australian Hip Hop culture. Don’t come to America and try to convince me that you’re Gangsta Boo. She’s a beautiful girl. Capitalize off of the supermodeling thing! But we’re not going to believe you if you’re trying to convince us that you’re out here trap shooting…
This is what I have an issue with because my issue is never with any of the artists and what they bring to the table. My issue is with the higher powers. I don’t consider her Hip Hop. I listen to her album. Everything that I hear on there is everything but that. And I feel like Hip Hop is Hip Hop. The same way they took R&B and okay, for the ones that are considered ‘real’ R&B, we’re going to call them Neo-Soul, so now we can call Ariana Grande R&B. Hip Hop is representative of this: to inform and empower inner city youth. I’m fine with anybody’s race, creed or color participating, but don’t ever forget what it was created for in the first place.”
She also stood with Nicki Minaj in her statements at the BET Awards earlier this year about the importance of women rappers writing their own rhymes.
“There are too many passes being given. Everybody was mad at Nicki for making that comment at BET. This is what I wanna say: When did it become wrong to call out people that don’t write their own rhymes? When did that become a crime in Hip Hop? This is Hip Hop at the end of the day.”
What do you guys think?Do you agree with Rah statement

thoughtsofablackgirl:

Don’t Come To America And Try To Convince Me That You’re Gangsta Boo”: Rah Digga  On Iggy Azaela

Iggy Azalea, it’s like.,  I can’t really get into her because it’s just not real to me. And not for nothing because people have accents in real life as opposed to when they work. But let me say this to you. There is a white girl from Australia that spits in an Australian accent and her name is Chelsea Jane. That I can get into. Teach me Australian Hip Hop culture. Don’t come to America and try to convince me that you’re Gangsta Boo. She’s a beautiful girl. Capitalize off of the supermodeling thing! But we’re not going to believe you if you’re trying to convince us that you’re out here trap shooting…

This is what I have an issue with because my issue is never with any of the artists and what they bring to the table. My issue is with the higher powers. I don’t consider her Hip Hop. I listen to her album. Everything that I hear on there is everything but that. And I feel like Hip Hop is Hip Hop. The same way they took R&B and okay, for the ones that are considered ‘real’ R&B, we’re going to call them Neo-Soul, so now we can call Ariana Grande R&B. Hip Hop is representative of this: to inform and empower inner city youth. I’m fine with anybody’s race, creed or color participating, but don’t ever forget what it was created for in the first place.”

She also stood with Nicki Minaj in her statements at the BET Awards earlier this year about the importance of women rappers writing their own rhymes.

“There are too many passes being given. Everybody was mad at Nicki for making that comment at BET. This is what I wanna say: When did it become wrong to call out people that don’t write their own rhymes? When did that become a crime in Hip Hop? This is Hip Hop at the end of the day.”

What do you guys think?Do you agree with Rah statement

aerialiste:

sarahjeanalex:

About a month ago, Sophia Katz told me she was raped by a former friend and roommate of mine when she visited New York this past May. Yesterday, she published a piece chronicling the sexual abuse she experienced that week, using a pseudonym for her rapist. I shared the piece on multiple platforms and commended her bravery. I said, “This is very important, everyone should read this.” I said “We need to protect and support rape victims, defend young girls in the indie lit community against predatorial, privileged men.” Other people liked the post, shared it, added more supportive comments. But by the end of the day, there was no further discussion about it. No one asked who he is, even though he is an editor within a community we all participate in.

And then I realized, I hadn’t either.

I had felt afraid of ‘starting that war’ against him. I realized that maybe people were afraid to ask who he was because they already knew. Maybe he was someone they considered a friend. Maybe identifying him as a rapist made them uncomfortable and sad. Maybe they didn’t believe it.

I lived with this person for a year. I listened to the way he spoke about his exgirlfriend after she broke up with him. I listened when he told me he “didn’t see the point of hanging out with any of his female friends” because at the end of the day he doesn’t get to fuck them. I pulled my piece from his magazine that he had solicited me for because I no longer wanted to support the career of a casual misogynist.

We shouldn’t be afraid to discuss this publicly when Sophia has been brave enough to call out her abuser in a community where he has immense support and friendship. Stephen Tully Dierks should not be shielded because he is or was our friend. We should hold our friends as accountable as we hold everyone else, if not more.

What would happen if one woman told the truth about her life? The world would split open.” (Muriel Rukeyser, 1968)